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Category Archive: Hunting & Fishing

Here are all the SuperVegan blog posts categorized under Hunting & Fishing. XML

  1. Some of our very best friends on earth, including my Darwin Animal Doctors nonprofit co-founder Andrea Gordon, are about to risk their lives, going on Sea Shepherd’s latest whale protection campaign in Antarctica, Operation Divine Wind. The odd thing is that a few months ago, after Japan ended its 2011 whaling season early due to Sea Shepherd anti-whaling activities, Japan announced it was halting its Antarctic whaling program indefinitely. So Operation Divine Wind technically should not have needed to happen. However, Japan’s Antarctic whaling program recently got an unexpected financial boost that allowed it to start up again this year. Specifically, Japan’s government took tsunami victim relief funding, and spent it on military funding for the Japanese whaling fleet.


    Japanese whalers fight Sea Shepherd Conservation Society volunteers. Copyright Sea Shepherd

    Japan took 2.28 billion yen ($29.4 million USD) that was raised and earmarked to help victims of the Japanese tsunami disaster, and used that money to beef up military security for the Japanese Antarctic whaling fleet, in order to combat Sea Shepherd volunteers. The Sea Shepherd flag ship, the Steve Irwin, cost less than two million USD total in comparison, although it has been successful thus far in repelling the military weaponry of the Japanese fleet anyway (which has included guns, grenades, and LRADs). But this new military funding taken from disaster relief funds dwarfs previous years’ military funding for the Japanese whaling fleet.

    The Japanese whaling fleet left port in Japan this week, and is on its way to Antarctica now. So the Sea Shepherd fleet, currently in Australia, will depart to protect whales from the whaling fleet in the next couple weeks.

  2. A nice-looking wild oyster bed on the Cape Fear River in Wilmington, North Carolina. (Photo by Joe Brent on Flickr). By contrast, many commercial beds are just acre after acre of metal cages.

    A nice-looking wild oyster bed on the Cape Fear River in Wilmington, North Carolina. (Photo by Joe Brent on Flickr). By contrast, many commercial beds are just acre after acre of metal cages.

    There’s a lot of noise on the internet today about Christopher Cox’s “Consider the Oyster” which carries the slug/page title “It’s OK for vegans to eat oysters” and the subhead “Why even strict vegans should feel comfortable eating oysters by the boatload.”

    Cox’s basic thesis is that oysters don’t feel pain and that commercial oyster production/harvesting is far more ecologically friendly than most other industrial food production. He goes out of his way to say that oysters are sustainable for food use in a way that clams and mussels are not. He gets a qualified endorsement from Peter Singer. One can certainly argue with these things, but he’s basically done his homework. Except for seeming to have no clue what it means to be vegan.

    When I became a vegan, I didn’t draw an X through everything marked “Animalia” on the tree of life. And when I pick out my dinner, I don’t ask myself: What do I have to do to remain a vegan? I ask myself: What is the right choice in this situation? Eating ethically is not a purity pissing contest, and the more vegans or vegetarians pretend that it is, the more their diets start to resemble mere fashion—and thus risk being dismissed as such. Emerson wrote, “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds.”

    The only way for me to read this is that Cox doesn’t know what “vegan” means. He never became a vegan, and needn’t worry himself over remaining a vegan. Because of our very consistency (foolish or not) there’s no gray area for vegans when it comes to eating animals. Cox is trying to be ethical about his consumerism, and that’s great. I just don’t understand how the hell anyone thinks the way he’s going about it can be described as any form of veganism. It isn’t.

    Vegans do not knowingly/willingly/actively consume or purchase any part or bodily product of an animal that was taken from a living animal or for which an animal was killed. (I know that’s a lot to pack into a sentence, but there it is. End of story.) You can argue that this isn’t the most constructive approach to ethical consumerism, as Peter Singer does. But Peter Singer does not claim to be vegan, nor does he endorse the point of view that eating oysters can ever be vegan. Continue Reading…

  3. (all photo credits: Glenn Lockitch / Sea Shepherd)

    (all photo credits: Glenn Lockitch / Sea Shepherd)


    An update on the current Antarctic campaign, from Sea Shepherd crew member Andrea Gordon.

    This message was transmitted to New York from the Bob Barker vessel via satellite.

    So lots went on here yesterday – everything has been a really intense emotional rollercoaster. In the morning, we were told the campaign was over and we had to go back to port. I took the news really hard. Every day we were with the Nisshin Maru, I was just so happy knowing the whales were protected and safe. We had such an amazing and successful campaign, but going back to port knowing the whalers were still down here with the whales isn’t easy. I didn’t have much time to dwell on it though, because 30 minutes after that, we saw the Yushin Maru #3 on the horizon. We hadn’t seen that ship since it rammed us at the beginning of the month. Everyone jumped back into gear, we sent the small boat after the Yushin, packed with butyric acid, paint, and some angry Sea Shepherds ;) The small boat chased the Yushin through the ice at 15 knots, and the Yushin just slammed into a lot of the ice, risking damaging their ship to get away from our boat.

    Continue Reading…


  4. An update on the current Antarctic campaign, from Sea Shepherd crew member Andrea Gordon.

    This message was transmitted to New York from the Bob Barker vessel via satellite.

    Hey Tod! I never know if its Saturday or Tuesday down here! No days off on Antarctic whale saving duty! Its amazing that with a ship full of volunteers no one complains about not getting a day off or paid for over three months. There’s actually not that much to do on deck at the moment since the seas are still pretty big.

    The Nisshin Maru seems to be sticking with the rough weather at the moment, headed east. We’re about 30 miles north of the ice shelf, and equidistant to Australia and Africa. The days are certainly shorter than they were when we first got down here a couple of months ago. At the end of December, the darkest it got was a few hours of twilight. Now, there’s over eight hours of darkness. The rough seas and darkness make it really hard to see growlers – the smaller pieces of ice that have broken off from the icebergs. They blend into the white-capped ocean and are quite dangerous because they can do a lot of damage to a ship. So now we’re keeping a deck person on night bridge watch to help look for the growlers. I have the 4-8am tonight.
    Continue Reading…

  5. (Pete Bethune aboard the Shonan Maru #2)

    (Pete Bethune aboard the Shonan Maru #2)


    An update on the current Antarctic campaign, from Sea Shepherd crew member Andrea Gordon.

    This message was transmitted to New York from the Bob Barker vessel via satellite.

    Hey Tod! I just watched the video of Pete Bethune entering the Shonan Maru #2. Very bold! Boarding was the one thing he could do so that the Shonan wouldn’t get away with the attempted murder of him and his crew. He originally wanted to board when the New Zealand and Australian governments didn’t do anything after the Shonan sunk the Ady Gil. Pete went for one daylight boarding attempt from our small boat, but it was too dangerous in the small boat with the anti-boarding spikes. But he’s one intensely determined guy. He stayed on the Bob Barker until we met up with the Steve Irwin. Then he went all the way back to Australia, only to leave the safety of home, his wife and kids, to come back to the Southern Ocean and do a dangerous nighttime boarding of the Shonan.

    It was definitely dangerous. He went on a jet ski with two other people – a driver and a camera person. Then he had to balance on the jet ski, avoid the spikes, and cut the anti-boarding net – all in the dark at 14 knots! That’s pretty fast. Unfortunately, there’s no video of the actual boarding. There was a camera person on the jet ski, but apparently it was too hard to get the shot in the dark while staying on the jet ski.
    Continue Reading…

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