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Category Archive: Technology

Here are all the SuperVegan blog posts categorized under Technology. XML

  1. Victimless Leather, part of the Design and the Elastic Mind exhibit at MoMA.

    Victimless Leather, part of the Design and the Elastic Mind exhibit at MoMA.

    Some things that raise interesting questions have been collecting in my browser tabs bar. I thought I’d share them with you.

    • There’s a thorough post over at U.S. Food Policy about the scope of meat in rising food costs. It takes into account the rising cost of animal feed (and competition from the biofuels industry) and also the dramatic increases in meat consumption, especially in developing nations.
    • A turtle named Myrtle, who was well known in the backyards of her block in Williamsburg was painted pink, presumably by some construction workers. It became quite a local “human interest” story. It seems like Myrtle will be OK, which is great, but I’m sure that most of those sympathizing with her story would have no moral qualms eating turtle soup.
    • I’ve been noticing a similar disconnect in regards to Eight Belles, the racehorse who was driven to her death last week at the Kentucky Derby. The mainstream seems sort of upset about the abuse and effective murder of Eight Belles, but not really enough to realize that horse racing can be just as evil as their favorite bugaboo, dog fighting.
    • And finally, Paola Antonelli, a curator at the Museum of Modern Art has “killed” a piece by artists Oron Catts and Ionat Zurr called Victimless Leather. The tiny jacket-shaped object/creature was made of mouse stem cells and was kept alive via a nutrient tube. It (I actually feel OK using an inanimate pronoun here) grew faster than expected and clogged its own life-support system. Says Antonelli:
      [It] started growing, growing, growing until it became too big. And [the artists] were back in Australia, so I had to make the decision to kill it. And you know what? I felt I could not make that decision. I’ve always been pro-choice and all of a sudden I’m here not sleeping at night about killing a coat…That thing was never alive before it was grown.

      I wonder how Antonelli thinks other “things” become alive?

  2. It literally makes me sick when I think about the millions of animals who are tortured and killed in laboratories every year. Most people will decry animal testing when they’re confronted with images of cats with electronic devices sticking out of their brains or bunnies locked in boxes so that chemicals can be poured into their eyes. But after they compose themselves, a lot of people still come out in favor of vivisection, because if we didn’t test on animals, where would we be? And aren’t testers as ethical and responsible as possible?

    As far as I’m concerned, there’s no excuse for animal testing, and until it ends, every day should be World Day for Animals in Laboratories. But since it’s not, we have World Week for Animals in Laboratories, which began this past weekend.

    I never know where to begin with these things, so I’m just going to mention some of the more notable developments, old and new, as well as ways you can get involved. (I was going to try to work in this ”funny” Onion article, but it reads so close to reality that I found it hard to find much humor in it.) Continue Reading…

  3. As we’re all very aware, recent media coverage of veg-friendly issues usually takes the “OMG how trendy! Check out these five inch plastic heels!” tack. But Wired magazine’s June issue is impressively sophisticated and comprehensive on some of the top, tech-related issues facing the environment of animal agriculture: cow emissions, overfishing and honeybee hive collapse. I know, I know, I sound like an overly sincere sycophant, but what can I say? They got sweet graphics. Mmm, infoporn.

  4. It's like The Matrix, but the turkeys are the batteries and you're the robot overlords.

    It’s like The Matrix, but the turkeys are the batteries and you’re the robot overlords.

    The first manure-burning power plant in the US opened recently in Benson, Minnesota. The state’s 600 turkey farms generate more than $600 million dollars from 44.5 million birds-per-year. And that leaves behind a lot of manure.

    But rather than being an efficient disposal system for this (cruel, barbaric and unnecessary) industry, the plant is actually just so much pork. The process is not energy efficient, and turkey droppings make ideal fertilizer as is. The plant, built by a company called Fibrowatt, is heavily subsidized, to keep industry happy and presumably to keep us off dirty foreign fuels (wouldn’t wanna catch any cooties!).

    There’s a big write-up on the front page of today’s New York Times, which includes some choice quotes from Fibrowatt chief executive Rupert J. Fraser, including: “We are completely puzzled by why people would make such a major effort to denigrate what we’re doing.” Rupert, I denigrate all over you.

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