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Category Archive: Trans Fats

Here are all the SuperVegan blog posts categorized under Trans Fats. XML

  1. Sweet & Sara croissants: no more trans fats, just as much delicious.

    Sweet & Sara croissants: no more trans fats, just as much delicious.

    The trans fat saga continues: from the lunch table to the dessert plate. Many bakers rely on hydrogenated products (cream cheeses, margarines, shortenings, etc.) for imparting a richer taste and texture than their healthier, non-hydrogenated counterparts. But vegan baker Sara Sohn of Sweet & Sara contends that the difference isn’t significant enough to rely on the trans fats. Her marshmallows, smores, cookies and cakes are made with non-hydrogenated Earth Balance buttery sticks, but the margarine in S&S croissants was formerly of the hydrogenated variety. “The margarine with hydrogenated oil gives a slighty more rich, ‘buttery’ taste than the non-hydrogenated,” she says.

    But while she’s changed her ways for her company, Sohn personally enjoys the trans fats. “The only vegan cheese I can tolerate–and actually like–is Tofutti. And for as long as I can remember, I’ve enjoyed finishing my meal at VP2 with a scoop of Klein’s pistachio ice cream,” she told me. “I’d be disappointed if I didn’t have access to such products.”

    This is part four of SuperVegan’s “No more trans-fats? But how will I go on?” series on the ban as it affects vegans in New York City. Read parts one, two and three to catch up on all the controversy, and stay tuned for more news on the bakerly front.

  2. ‘sNice owner Mike Walter has been scrambling to get rid of all hydrogenated oils on his menu since New York City passed a ban on trans-fats last year. First it was the cream cheese (Tofutti); then the more insidious margarine (Willow Run soy-based – three grams each serving, and three boxes in my freezer right now). Mike Walter thought his Tofutti American cheese was okay. Mike Walter was wrong.

    “You can go to McDonalds,” Walter said when I broke the bad news. “You can sit on the couch all day smoking Marlboros. But you can’t have Tofutti.”

    So why didn’t Walter know that? Because Tofutti flouts the law. Food manufacturers are required to include a “trans fat” count on the Nutritional Information of all products. Tofutti cheese lacks this basic info, and so, in turn, do restaurants such as s’Nice and Foodswings. It’s great to see Walter and ‘sNice making an effort to change. But perhaps a mystery has been solved: is this where that awful plastic cheese smell comes from..?

    This is part three of SuperVegan’s “No more trans-fats? But how will I go on?” series on the ban as it affects vegans in New York City (unlike those in LA – see, I don’t hate everything about LA!). Read part one and part two, and eat Tofutti cheese on your sandwiches here and here – if you’re into that sort of thing.

  3. Tofutti hard cheese is the most widely-available vegan cheese in the country. If you look at the label, you won’t see any trans-fat count — just that the second top ingredient is partially hydrogenated soybean oil, the most popular source of man-made trans-fats the NYC law seeks to ban.

    “If you create a proper vegan recipe, it won’t include trans-fats,” says Cliff Preefer, the chef at Sacred Chow. Not only proper according to Cliff, but lawful according to the City of New York: as of July 2008, restaurants are banned from using trans-fats in any of their foods. And unlike with their cream cheese, Tofutti doesn’t offer a non-hydrogenated version. But out of the six restaurants I contacted, Foodswings is the only one using Tofutti — and the only one without a plan for change.

    This is part two of SuperVegan’s “No more trans-fats? But how will I go on?” series on the ban as it affects vegans in New York City. You can read part one here. After the jump, a brief run-down of some of the top vegan-cheesy restauranteurs in the city. (P.S. Get your act together, Kate’s.)
    Continue Reading…

  4. Better than hydrogenated?

    Better than hydrogenated?

    For the trans-fat ban, of course! Phase one goes into effect this summer, barring the use of partially hydrogenated oils for frying foods in restaurants. By July 2008, they have to eliminate trans-fats from all food. But Steve Kass, PR for Tofutti, Inc., says this doesn’t affect his company, which delivers trans-fatty Better than Cream Cheese and Sour Supreme as a food manufacturer.

    This is part one of SuperVegan’s “No more trans-fats? But how will I go on?” series on the ban as it affects vegans in New York City. Kass explains Tofutti’s part after the jump.
    Continue Reading…

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